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Kinim

First Perek, Fourth Mishna

Expanded Translation

What is an example of one type of obligation? A woman dedicates (makdish) two groups of birds , each group for one or more childbirth obligations, or dedicates two groups, each group for one or more ziva obligations. In each case the obligations are of the same type.

An example of two types is that the woman dedicates one group of birds for childbirth obligations and another group for ziva obligations.

What is an example of two women? One group was dedicated because of the childbirth obligations on this woman, the other group because of the childbirth obligations on that woman, or one group was dedicated because of the ziva obligations on this woman, the other group because of the ziva obligations on that woman. Both women's obligations are the same type. An example of two types of obligations brought by two women is that one group is dedicated because of the childbirth obligations on this woman, the other group because of the ziva obligations on that woman.

Comment

In the preceding case of two women, each woman's birds were grouped separately at the start and became mingled. Rabbi Yosi now presents another case of two women. In his case the birds were dedicated as a group for the use of the women and for their various obligations. In this case, mingling does not cause a problem.


Expanded Translation

Rabbi Yosi says if two women bought their birds in partnership or jointly gave their money to the Kohain for the purchase of their kinim the Kohain may bring each Chatos for whichever woman he wants and each Olah for whichever woman he wants regardless whether the obligations of the two women were the same type or two different types.

Case of the Mishna

Rochel and Leah gave their four jointly owned birds or their joint funds to the Kohain.

Din

The Kohain may bring any two of the birds for Rochel and the other two for Leah.

Reason

The owner of a bird or animal may dedicate it for another person's korbon.

In this case, each bird brought by Rochel and Leah is owned by both of them in partnership and is dedicated by both of them together. When the Kohain chooses a bird to be a Chatos for Rochel, Leah is implicitly assigning her share in the bird for Rochel's Chatos. (Rochel is, of course, also designating her share of that bird for her own Chatos.)

Similarly, when the Kohain chooses another bird for Leah's Chatos, Rochel and Leah each designate that bird, to the extent that each has ownership in the bird, for Leah's Chatos.

Comment

This explanation is given by the Ya'ir Kino, based on the Rosh and the Ra'avad. (Rabbi Yosi's din is understood in other ways by other meforshim.)


Text © 1997
Rabbi Menachem Moshe Oppen and Project Genesis, Inc.

Feedback is appreciated! It can be sent to: oppen@torah.org.


 






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