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Posted on April 27, 2012 By Rabbi Yaakov Feldman | Series: | Level:

1. “G-d has brought about very many means of affecting His created beings”, Ramchal adds at the end of this section. And among those means of affecting us are many that are “specific to each one of them, depending on his makeup”.

That’s to say, G-d interacts with the universe in very many ways, moment by moment. We’ve learned, though, that sometimes those interactions are actually reactions — G-d’s responses to our interactions with Him; and that at other times they’re not interactions with us at all but rather products of G-d’s own plans that are wholly independent of us and our actions.

The bottom line, though, is that G-d does interact with the universe and us, and that each Divine act is suited to our individuality.

2. It is likewise true, Ramchal continues, that there is one “overarching rule” at play when it comes to this: that all His interactions “function within the realm of time”, and that “every day (in fact, every moment) a different (category of) interactions holds sway”. That goes a long way to explain the unique tone and temper of the Shabbat and the Holy Days as opposed to other times, for example; the uniqueness of morning as opposed to afternoon and nighttime prayer services; etc.

We need to understand as well, though, that while an overall and distinctive mode of interaction holds sway at each one of those special moments, that’s not to say that each one of us is affected the same way at those times. Because each moment is not only tailored to its own need, but to the specific needs of everyone there at the time.

And lastly, we’re to know that these principles have been in place throughout our lives as well as through the course of history.


Rabbi Yaakov Feldman has translated and commented upon “The Gates of Repentance”, “The Path of the Just”, and “The Duties of the Heart” (Jason Aronson Publishers). His works are available in bookstores and in various locations on the Web.




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