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THE BEST

It is inspiring to watch the best in the field perform. It really doesn't matter whether it is a gymnast in an international competition, a scholar explaining a complex phenomena or an artist creating a thing of beauty. Observing the results of years of training and development of a G-d-given talent is uplifting. Even the most blase of observers might dream of being able to match the champion's performance. "I wish I could do that!" is a valid reaction

Fortunately, in Heaven one is not judged in relation to the best on Earth. One is measured as to how well one developed his or her innate potential. Every human being is unique and is blessed with abilities at birth that are seeds of his or her greatness. One is not expected to exceed one's potential -- one is expected, however, to develop it to the fullest.

Self-analysis is not supposed to be simply what one has accomplished but rather what one could achieve as measured against what one can do The first step on the ladder of success is to evaluate one's potential. Then the job of life becomes fulfillment of one's ability quotient. A smart individual avoids self-deception. A wise soul avoids comparison to others. The truly intelligent being measures one's performance against one's unique potential.

Shoot for success. Every night spend a minute evaluating your day. Start with the question: "Did I do my best to become the best "me" I am capable of being?" A daily dose of this personality medicine will yield spiritual health in the long term.

DID YOU KNOW THAT

We do not send a father and son, or two brothers up to the Sefer Torah consecutively because of fear of the evil eye.

If a person says that they would like to follow their brother or father up to read the Sefer Torah we do not listen. [We send someone up in between and then may send up the relative].

If, however, the person was already ready to read when we realize that he is the brother or son of the previous "oleh"[reader] then we may permit him to say the blessings and read if he does not care about the evil eye. [Source Yalkut Yosef, Siman 141, paragraph 21,22]

CONSIDER THIS FOR A MINUTE

The principle for parents is that there must be a perfect balance between the left hand pushing away and the right hand drawing close. An extreme of one or the other can ruin the child and ruin the family.

Rabbi Simcha Wasserman zt'l


Text Copyright © 2003 Rabbi Raymond Beyda and Project Genesis, Inc.


 






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