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PLANNER

By Rabbi Raymond Beyda

One of the keys to success is good planning. Setting a clear goal and planning the steps towards achievement of the goal is a talent shared by successful people in all walks of life. Leaving things to chance or “playing it by ear” is too risky and often yields a result far different than the one that one works to produce.

But don’t confuse a good planner with a worrier. A good planner has confidence that his or her plan will work. Positive thinking also makes one flexible to alter the plan along the way to compensate for changes in circumstances or miscalculations in the original outline. A worrier, on the other hand, reviews and evaluates from a position of negative thinking. He or she is so concerned that problems and failures are avoided but doesn’t get moving forward towards the goal because of an overload of concerns that just might not even happen anyway. The fear of failure freezes the worrier in a position of inactivity.

Today when you decide to get something done – stop and make a plan. A plan geared for success taking all possibilities into account. It is o.k. to review and re-evaluate but don’t freeze. Get moving towards your goal ready to adjust the plan while anticipating ultimate success. It only takes a minute but it will help achieve what you are out to accomplish.

DID YOU KNOW THAT

One who is reading Keriyat Shema is not allowed to signal with the eyes or mouth out words with ones lips or point with ones fingers while reading the first paragraph. Some rule that even in the second paragraph these restrictions apply. They do, however, allow these signals in the second paragraph -- ONLY IF IT CONCERNS MISVAH PERFORMANCE. [Source, Shulhan Arukh, O’H Siman 63:6 and Mishnah Berurah op. cite.]

CONSIDER THIS FOR A MINUTE

Rebbi Hiya and Rebbi Shimon bar Rebbi were sitting together. One said, “One who is praying should look down towards the ground.” The other replied, ‘One should have their eyes looking up towards heaven.” Each quoted a verse of the Torah in support of his position. In the meantime Rebbi Yishmael bar Rebbi Yoseh came by and asked, “What are you busy discussing?” “We are discussing prayer,” they replied. “Rebbi Yoseh says that one should have their eyes looking down in humility and his heart should be hoping heavenward in order to fulfill the requirements of both verses”, he explained. [Yebamot 105b]

Raymond J Beyda
www.raymondbeyda.com


Text Copyright © 2004 Rabbi Raymond Beyda and Torah.org.


 






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