Torah.org Home Subscribe Services Support Us
 
Print Version

Email this article to a friend

The Promise of a Thief

By Rabbi Daniel Travis

"I will be in his eyes k’metate’ah (like an impostor)." (Bereshith 27:12)

As explained previously, lying is such a serious transgression that it is compared to idol worship. Truth, on the other hand, is such a fundamental value in Jewish thought that clinging to truth can lead one to a life of Torah observance, as described in the following story.

An inveterate thief once approached a rav with the announcement that he had decided to abandon his life of crime. He begged the rav to tell him what he could do to make amends for his many acts of theft. He fully expected the rav to instruct him to undergo a rigorous process of repentance.

The rav, however, realized that any such stringent regimen would prove too difficult for the penitent thief, and he would not be able to maintain it for long. He therefore told the thief that the only change he would need to accept upon himself was an absolute dedication to truth under all circumstances; he should never allow himself to utter even the smallest lie. The thief gave his word that he would do as the rav had instructed him, and with that he left the rav’s home, delighted that so little was being demanded of him.

It was not long before the thief’s excitement over the notion of repenting wore off, and he was seized by the urge to rob someone’s house. As he was on his way to carry out his intention, someone inquired of him where he was headed. Remembering the one promise he had made to the rav, he would not lie, but neither could he bring himself to tell the truth – that he was going to commit a theft. He therefore changed his mind about his anticipated action, and returned home. This scene repeated itself in various forms again and again, until finally he realized that his career as a thief was over; never again would he attempt to steal. He was then able to put his past behind him completely and make a fresh start1.

How did the rav know that merely telling the thief not to lie would influence his behavior so dramatically? Rav Yochanan ben Zakkai taught that the embarrassment caused by fear of what others will think is the strongest motivation to stop one from transgressing2. Since people are in constant interaction with one another, it would be nearly impossible for the penitent thief to remain faithful to his promise to always speak the truth while maintaining a life of crime. A steadfast dedication to the truth was therefore the most appropriate way of keeping him from faltering while correcting his ways.

Footnotes:

1 Sefer Chasidim 647.
2 Brachoth 28b.


Text Copyright © 2007 by Rabbi Daniel Travis and Torah.org


 






ARTICLES ON YOM KIPPUR:

View Complete List

Picture Perfect
Rabbi Berel Wein - 5763

It's a Fast One
Rabbi Pinchas Winston - 5757

The Role of Teshuvah
Shlomo Katz - 5759

Looking for a Chavrusah?

Sair HaMishtaleach: The Scapegoat
Rabbi Osher Chaim Levene - 5767

Understanding Our Special Conduct
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5755

“The Secrets of Change”
Jon Erlbaum -

> Avinu Malkeinu
Rabbi Label Lam - 5770

The Key to Clemency
Rabbi Moshe Peretz Gilden - 5761

Did You Hear?
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5763

ArtScroll

Ideas for Inspiration
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5760

The Fast of Gedalya
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5760

A Happy Day
Shlomo Katz - 5769

Frumster - Orthodox Jewish Dating

Call to Arms
Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky - 5758

I am a Work in Progress
Rabbi Dovid Green - 5760

Identical Deeds
Rabbi Yisroel Ciner - 5760

Interpersonal Relationships
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5755



Project Genesis

Torah.org Home


Torah Portion

Jewish Law

Ethics

Texts

Learn the Basics

Seasons

Features

TORAHAUDIO

Ask The Rabbi

Knowledge Base




Help

About Us

Contact Us



Free Book on Geulah!




Torah.org Home
Torah.org HomeCapalon.com Copyright Information